California T&T Information


By Deanna Hanford

The Junior Olympic (JO) program includes levels 1-10.  In California, athletes begin competition at level 4 in Trampoline, Tumbling and Double mini.  An athlete may enter the JO program at level 7 or below depending upon the coaches assessment of the athlete. However, once an athlete competes at a level, he/she must meet all mobility requirements in order to move up to the next level.  The current US JO Routines are explained in the following sections: Tumbling, Trampoline, and Double Mini

 

USAG Routines 2013

 

 

2016 Levels 1-7*

 

2016 Level 8-9

 

2016 Level 10

Birth year

Age Group

 

Birth year

Age Group

 

Birth year

Age Group

08 & later

8 & under

 

06 & later

10 & under

 

04-06

10-12

06-07

9-10

 

04-05

11-12

 

02-03

13-14

04-05

11-12

 

02-03

13-14

 

00-01

15-16

02-03

13-14

 

01 & earlier

15 & over

 

99 & earlier

17 & over

01 & earlier

15 & over

 

 

 

 

  

 

*L1-4 have 

7-8 & 6U 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016 Age Groups Tumbling
In all levels of power tumbling there are 2 passes performed on a progressive rod tumbling strip.  At Level 4 (both passes) and Level 5 (the first pass) must begin with a power hurdle instead of a run.  This helps to develop proper technique and allows the athlete to become a strong tumbler. These passes that do not have a somersault as the last skill, must end in a rebound.  The rebound is judged as to how well it was blocked.  The term "blocked" means that the preceding back handspring was performed in a different manner than the technique of using back handsprings to gain speed.  This allows the tumbler to push his/her body into the floor (block), stopping their horizontal momentum and rebounding high above the ground, much more efficiently than a mere jump.

Level 4 & 5 athletes master the back handspring, which is the basis for all power tumbling.  In level 6 the athlete will master a series of back handsprings from a run or  power hurdle and then is introduced to beginning somersaults in the second pass.  In level 7, somersaulting in a full 8-skill pass is introduced. The Level 7 athlete must also perform one whip salto in the 2nd pass.  In levels 8, 9 and 10 the first pass is a compulsory pass designed to make sure the athlete is capable of competing at that level.  The second pass is an optional pass with different skill choices and therefore the addition of a score for difficulty. As the athlete advances through the levels, the skill choices increase.  Level 8 introduces bounding whips and now has the choice to end the 2nd pass with wither a back pike, straight or full twist. Level 9 masters twisting by performing up to 2 full twists in a somersault or they can choose to perform one double somersault tuck.   Level 10 athletes have two optional passes: pass 1 is a "straight" pass, where they must perform a double somersault and no somersault may twist more than 180o.  The second pass is a twisting pass where they must perform at least one somersault with 360o twist.

In tumbling, long, stretched, back handsprings are desired.  They should move rapidly and rhythmically down the center of the tumble strip.  The ending somersault should be blocked and performed very high and show a kick out of the tuck or pike position.  Whip saltos should be performed at or below shoulder height. The pass must end in a 2-foot landing.

Three judges evaluate the tumbling pass from a 10.0 start value and deduct for performance faults (from 0-0.5) on each skill.  The superior judge instructs the panel of any additional deductions including landing faults.  All three execution scores are flashed and tallied for the pass total.  The score from both passes are added for the final score.  Beginning in level 8, the degree of difficulty (DD) is added to each optional pass total.

Example 1: Tumbling Level 5 -7 
               Performance scores
 TU
J1
J2
J3
Sub
Final

Pass 1

8.8
8.9
9.1
26.8
51.7
Pass 2
8.3
8.4
8.2
24.9

Example 32: Tumbling Level 8-9 
                 Performance scores

 TU
J1
J2
J3
DD
Sub
Final
Pass 1
8.5
8.4
8.5
0
25.4
54.1
Pass 2
8.3
8.4
8.4
2.4
27.1
 

Example 3: Tumbling Level 10                 Performance scores

 TU
J1
J2
J3
DD
Sub
Final
Pass 1
8.5
8.4
8.5
3.7
29.1
57.6
Pass 2
8.3
8.1
8.2
3.9
28.5
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Trampoline
In levels 1-7 athletes perform one 10-bounce compulsory routine.  In levels 8, 9 &10, the athlete performs one 10-skill compulsory routine and a 10-skill voluntary routine. The position requirements are the same as for DM. All positions must be closed!  This means that on any tuck position the athlete must touch their legs below the knees on the shins.  They also must touch their toes or lower shins/ankles on all pike or straddle positions.  Athletes must kick out of all tucked or piked saltos.  Arms must be close to the body at other times.  In addition, the height of the jump, and maintaining that height throughout the routine is very important.  An athlete should try to perform all the skills in one location and not travel about the trampoline bed.  To begin a routine an athlete may take as many preparatory bounces as needed as long as they begin the routine within 1 minute from the time the superior judge salutes.  An athlete may either end the routine on the last bounce or he/she may take one out bounce in a stretched position.

Another important aspect of judging trampoline is the phase of the skill in which the position is shown. The athletes should show the position (tuck, pike, or straight) at the top of the skill (between 10 and 2 o'clock) followed by a press-out.  The press-out or kick out should take place by vertical, even on multiple somersaults.  The press-out position is a straight body with head neutral and arms pressing down to the side. The athlete is expected to "keep" this straight position until they pass horizontal or 3 o'clock.

Three judges evaluate the trampoline pass from a 10.0 start value and deduct for performance faults (from 0 to 0.5) on each skill.  They also judge the landing.  The Chair of Judges Panel will instruct the panel of any additional deductions to make.  All three scores are flashed and tallied for the final score.  No degree of difficulty is added since levels 1-7 are compulsory routines.  Levels 8-10 will receive degree of difficulty for the 2nd routine only,.

Example 1:  Trampoline Levels 4-7
                  Performance scores
 TR
J1
J2
J3
Final
Pass 1
8.0
7.9
8.2
24.1

Example 2:  Trampoline Levels 8-10 & Jr Elites
                   Performance scores
 TR
J1
J2
J3
DD
Sub
Final
Pass 1
8.0
7.9
8.2
0
24.1
54.2
Pass 2
7.7
7.6
7.8
7.0
30.1

 

Double Mini
Double mini (DM) is an event where an athlete performs one skill onto the trampoline bed and one skill as a dismount off of the trampoline bed.  Since only two skills are performed, height, form in the air, and the landing are extremely important.  All positions must be closed!  This means that on any tuck position the athlete must touch the legs below the knees on the shins.  Athletes also must touch their toes or lower shins/ankles on all pike or straddle positions.  Athletes must kick out of all tucked or piked saltos.  Arms must be close to the body at other times.  The phase in which the athlete performs the skills is also important (see trampoline).

There are two types of mounts allowed for the first skill.  A mounter is when an athlete jumps onto the slanted mounting bed of the DM and immediately performs a skill that lands on the upper bed (spotter / dismount bed) of the DM.  A spotter is when an athlete jumps onto the slanted mounting bed of the DM and does a straight jump that lands on the upper bed of the DM and then performs a skill that also lands on the same bed.  There is a red penalty zone that separates the slanted bed from the upper bed.

The athlete perform compulsory passes in levels 1-7. Three judges evaluate each DM pass from a 10.0 start value and deduct for performance faults (0-0.5) on each skill.  The superior judge will instruct the panel of any additional deductions to make.  All three scores are flashed and tallied for the pass total.  The score from both passes are added for the final score.  The degree of difficulty (DD) is added to levels 8-10 scores.  For levels 8-10 the athlete performs 2 voluntary passes and will receive DD in addition to their performance scores.

Landing in DM is a very important part of the score. Not only are the athletes judged on the stability of the landing (taking steps, wobbles, falling, etc), they are also jugde on where they land. There are 3 landing zones.   Athletes should land in the target zone A for no deductions.  If they land in Zone B or Zone C there are severe penalties. 

Example 1: DM Level 1-7

 Performance scores
 DM
J1
J2
J3
Sub
Final
Pass 1
9.5
9.4
9.5

28.4

55.4

Pass 2
9.3
9.4
9.3
27.0

 Example 2: DM Level 8-10 
                Performance scores
 DM
J1
J2
J3
DD
Sub
Final
Pass 1
9.5
9.4
9.5

3.1

31.5

62.5

Pass 2
9.3
9.4
9.3

3.0

31.0

 


 

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